Small Company Growth Trends

The median sales of a company going public has gone from an average $15 million in 1999 and 2000 to $164 million in 2004.  Smaller companies have decided not to go public as often as in years past, and they reap the quick – and cheap – money as a result of that decision.  The question is “why?” A company with only $15 million in annual revenues would most likely not want to have an IPO and absorb all of the attendant costs and the on-going fees related to going public.  They also would not want to have to spend the money necessary to comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley regulations.  Smaller companies have to pay a hefty price to go public – and remain public.  In fact, a recent Business Week article reported that “Bankers expect a record number of U.S. companies to go private this year, topping last year’s 86.” Many CEOs, in order to rapidly grow their businesses, merge or acquire other companies.  However, many of these do not work out and the acquired entities eventually get sold … [Read more...]

M&A Trends

A  recent article in M&A Today offered some observations concerning current and future M&A trends. “The business world is constantly changing.  For the first half of the 20th century, vertical integration was the objective in which, oil companies, for example, owned the entire process from drilling to retailing at the gas station.  From 1950 to 1980, diversification was in vogue.  Recently, the trend is to outsource everything except the core business.  One of the new business models known as the new profit imperative is to go downstream and get closer to the ultimate customer.” Today’s M&A Climate Many companies still look to acquisitions as the best way to increase both capability and market share.  Acquisitions generally add complementary products, new technology or increase geographic coverage.  Interestingly, today’s companies are investing in new ventures, while, at the same time; divesting themselves of some of their original businesses.  Since these … [Read more...]